Road Trip USA 2011

  1st August we are now in Billings Montana.”

 Today we went to the site of the battle of the “Little Big Horn, some know it as Custers last stand. Personally I don’t think he had an erection at all that day he was too busy shooting Indians. Not enough though, he and his 200 soldiers were wiped out by the Sioux and mainly Cheyenne with help from a few other tribes, who been banded together, this by itself was a unique happenstance for Indians , under the guidance of chief Sitting Bull.

 

 We actually thought they missed an opportunity here. The place is good, the venue all professional and ship shape. The thing was the story telling by the guides and they were “proper injuns”, was uninspired, rather boring to be honest, the best was a young Crow girl she still only scored 6/10 though , as as much information as she delivered I learned very little about the battle, other than that the Indians call it “the battle of greasy grass hill”. It just goes to show how in tune with their environment they were, the topography was more important than the incident. The greasy part is an apt description of the grass that grows there, it has a glossy sheen and animals that graze on it put on weight, as if they had been eating fatty food.

 

This battle is a complicated scene mind and covers a huge area, much larger than any Custer movies would have you believe, so I listened to another Indian giving his version. I wish I hadn’t , or at least had sat at the back instead of right on the front row. I could have snook off, it was so throbbingly boring. I know I could do the job so much better and the audience would leave inspired instead of loosing the will to live as we were.

David Rattray RIP you could teach these people so much about story telling.

 

One thing I did pick up was off a couple of fellow tourists. My impression of Colonel Custer up to this point was, that he was a grand standing show off and a bit of a plonker. Nothing could be further from the truth, according to these guys. Custer they said single handedly probably turned the battle of Gettysburg from a certain southern victory into a union one. By, they say leading his out numbered cavalry in an attack on a rebel battalion who were engaged in a flanking manoeuvre to reinforce Lees main  battle army, not once but twice. He was beaten off at the first but turned his group round and lead them strait back in again, that is why he became something of a star turn.

 

  In my humble opinion, the failure to reach the audience at this venue stems from a lack of humor too much self esteem and a soupcon of pomposity or maybe unfounded swagger. I can’t decide.

 

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